Slight, daily variations


From:
Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2012 12:43 PM
To: Lori Swanson, attorney general, State of Minnesota; Lori Swanson, attorney general, State of Minnesota (alt email address); Lori Swanson, attorney general, State of Minnesota (2nd alt email address)
Cc: Jeff Holman, communications director, Dept. of Human Rights, State of Minnesota
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Minnesota Attorney General II

Please reply.


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

[previous message]

credit score, employers, Minnesota Attorney General

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2012 12:50 AM
To: Lori Swanson, attorney general, State of Minnesota; Lori Swanson, attorney general, State of Minnesota (alt email address); Lori Swanson, attorney general, State of Minnesota (2nd alt email address)
Subject: credit score, employers, Minnesota Attorney General

See this message and your response at http://blog.creditscoring.com/?tag=minnesota-attorney-general.

You wrote: “Credit scores are used by credit card companies, auto lenders, landlords, and home mortgage lenders to predict the likelihood that a consumer will pay their bills. They are also used by insurance companies to decide how much to charge people for homeowners and automobile insurance and by some employers.”

In the same document, you also wrote: “Credit scores are not only used by lenders. Landlords, employers, utility companies and insurance companies also use a variation of the credit score in determining whether to rent an apartment, give a job, underwrite an insurance policy, or hook up electricity.”

The consumer reporting agencies all state that they do not provide credit scores for employment purposes.

What indicates that employers use credit scores?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

credit score, employers, American Public Media

Sometimes, it gets nasty.

In 2009, American Public Media responded regarding the notion of employers using credit scores.

Here is the last part of that exchange:

From: Judson, George
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2009 12:45 PM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Subject: Marketplace

Mr. Fisher,

Regarding Janet Babin’s feature on FICO scores on Marketplace Money the weekend of April 17, we have confirmed that employers do not receive credit scores when they obtain credit reports for screening job applicants. We’ll correct this on Marketplace Money and in our archives at www.marketplace.org.

George Judson
Managing editor
Marketplace
[email address]
[telephone number]


From: creditscoring.com [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2009 11:17 AM
To: Judson, George; Babin, Janet; Robideau, Brad
Cc: Ira Rheingold, National Association of Consumer Advocates; Burt Flickinger, Strategic Resource Group; Steven Wagner, Experian; TessVigeland; Brad Anderson, Best Buy; ‘Andy Bessette’; Susan Boren, Spencer Stuart; ‘George Buckley’; Gordon Crawford; mail@kpcc; Patrick J. Denzer; Janet M. Dolan; Ian R. Friendly; Kling, Bill; Schmitt, Christina; news@unc.edu; wunc@wunc.org; info@naca.net; Ian Lyngklip; DeVonna Joy; Susan Henson, Experian; Jarrett Crowell
Subject: RE: credit score, employers VIII, exactly V

For the feature, who was your source for the information regarding credit score use by employers?

Who confirmed that employers do not receive credit scores?


From: Judson, George
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2009 2:46 PM
To: creditscoring.com
Subject: RE: credit score, employers VIII, exactly V

None of your business. Take your obsession elsewhere.


See the 7/25/11 message to APM.

Employers credit score Catch-22 myth, Tribune Co. IV

[previous post]

It has been a contentious and rocky road, but Maryland media may finally be getting it (it’s a start, anyway) right.

After publishing

[Vangel Paper co-owner Valerie S.] Androutsopoulos said she doesn’t have blanket rules about using the reports and tends to ignore bad credit scores if they involve medical or education debts or mortgage issues,

the Baltimore Sun (“Light for All”) publshed a follow-up: 

Employers already are barred from seeing a person’s credit score, but the Assembly wants to limit their ability to access the entire report.

Regarding the first piece, the paper’s politics and government editor wrote:

Mr. Fisher:

Thank you for calling this issue to our attention. We have run a correction in our print and online editions.

However, the correction does not appear on the paper’s errors and corrections (named “Corrections and Clarifications”) web page.  Further, other items from the same fold are still wrong

It does not stop with media.