Acknowledgement

Here is a list of steps to attempt to get the attention of people who misinform citizens.

1. Email
2. Social media message
3. Postcard
4. Letter
5. Certified letter, return reciept requested
6. Visit, in-person, whistle stop

Further steps (if necessary) might include cash, merciless berating and singing telegrams.

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 2:50 PM
To: José Quiñonez, executive director, Mission Asset Fund, and chairperson, Consumer Advisory Board, U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
Subject: The right thing

You wrote: “Experian, a major credit reporting agencies[SIC], estimates that 66 million Americans are unscoreable[SIC]—they do not have enough credit history to generate a credit score. And without a credit score, they can’t get loans to buy cars, start businesses, get mortgages, rent apartments, or even get jobs.”

However, Experian also states, “Employers never get a credit score.”

So, where did you get the idea that employers use credit scores?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

Forbes’ attempt at hipness; Forbes’ correction policy

Ah, youth, and fabulous New York.

The “journalist,” “Interactive Editor,” and “web editor” now works for Reuters, who has it all figured out.

And if you think that’s rich

 

[ORIGINAL MESSAGE]

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:43 PM
To: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes; Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes
Subject: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20

See this message and your response at http://blog.creditscoring.com/?p=2274, http://blog.creditscoring.com/?cat=134 and http://blog.creditscoring.com/?tag=forbes.

You wrote

But one’s creditworthiness, as reflected in a FICO score or a credit report, now affects a lot more than the ability to borrow money or buy something on credit. It can affect whether you get a job, what you pay for insurance, and even how your personal relationships work out.

and

Employment consultants say a troubling credit score may cause hiring officers to more closely question an applicant. Vic Tanon, chief simplicity officer at Emplicity, an organization that consults in hiring practices across the U.S., says a bad credit rating is likely to be more of a factor in certain industries like financial services.

Who is your source regarding credit score use by employers?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 3:10 PM
To: Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Cc: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes; Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes; Monie Begley, Forbes
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

Did you discuss the topic of credit scores with Forbes?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 3:09 PM
To: Greg Fisher
Subject: Out of Office: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

I am out of the office at a Fellowship orientation until July 31. Please excuse my late replies to emails. If you need immediate assistance, please contact Tina Russo. [Russo’s email].

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 9:28 PM
To: Tina Russo, senior editor, Forbes
Subject: FW: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

—–Original Message—–
From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 3:09 PM
To: Greg Fisher
Subject: Out of Office: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

I am out of the office at a Fellowship orientation until July 31. Please excuse my late replies to emails. If you need immediate assistance, please contact Tina Russo. [Russo’s email].

 

 

From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 5:56 AM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

Dear Greg,

My apologies for not responding to this until now. I am unsure if you spoke directly with him, but Vic Tannon was my source for that statement. Perhaps there is something you can add?

Heather Struck
Forbes
Markets, New York
[phone]
Follow me: http://blogs.forbes.com/people/hstruck/

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 7:43 AM
To: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes
Cc: Monie Begley, Forbes; Tina Russo, senior editor, Forbes; Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, CRAs

The consumer reporting agencies do not provide credit scores for employment purposes.

What correction will you make?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Struck, Heather [mailto:HStruck@forbes.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 8:01 AM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Cc: Begley, Monie; Russo, Tina; Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, CRAs

I understand your point, but it is very clearly sourced. The point there is some occupations have been known to look at credit scores in an evaluation, according to this source. I agree this point needs clarification, and you are very welcome to post a comment on the story.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/heatherstruck/2011/07/20/credit-score-fico-can-hurt-you/

Thanks for the note,

Heather Struck
Forbes
Markets, New York
[phone]
Follow me: http://blogs.forbes.com/people/hstruck/

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 1:12 PM
To: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes
Cc: Monie Begley, Forbes; Tina Russo, senior editor, Forbes; Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, clarity

Only you mentioned clarification so there is nothing to agree upon.

According to consumer reporting agency TransUnion, a “rating” is the manner of payment of an individual account.

Who are your other sources?

What authority do you, as the writer, have in making corrections of errors of fact, or clarifications of unclear stories or attribution published by Forbes?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 2:00 PM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, clarity

My editor has authority to make corrections. You can be in touch with him if you like.

Matthew Schifrin – [email address]

Thanks –

Heather Struck
Forbes
Markets, New York
[phone]
Follow me: http://blogs.forbes.com/people/hstruck/

 

Forbes misinformation about credit scores (typo also)

The Dirty Secret About Your Credit Score” is a deliciously seductive title of an inaccurate article on Forbes.com from Investopedia (too many –pedias) which is owned by ValueClick.

The filthy secret (are you sitting down?) is this: Loan interest rates are based on credit scores.

See “variable pricing” (now known as risk-based pricing) on creditscoring.com, circa 1998.

Before that 2010 shocker from ValueClick, in a typical introduction, the piece states, “It is a deciding factor for landlords in picking renters and some employers use credit scores to find dependable workers.”

Employers do not use credit scores because they cannot even get them (despite the story going around in Colorado the Colorado statehouse).

That rumor has a friend at Forbes (named Forbes).  Recently, Fair Isaac myFICO.com service namesake Suze Orman showed up and talked to a Forbes family member and did the deed.

Sloppy, sloppy, sloppy, New York.  And, there is a typographical error.  The ValueClick story says, “It determines the cost of majorpurchases[SIC] like cars and homes.”

At least they didn’t use the word even.

 

Suze Orman’s schtick

The consumer reporting agencies all state that they do not provide credit scores for employment purposes.

Suze Orman, “internationally acclaimed personal finance expert,” is on tour right now, and tonight, she has a spot on Real Time with Bill Maher [submit question].

Despite the fact that employers do not use credit scores (they cannot even get them), Orman keeps saying (and writing) that employers do use credit scares scores.  It must sell.

Tonight, will she use the same talking point, set the record straight, or neither?  Here are examples of the millionaire’s tour schtick.

Hosted by Allowed to bleat on unquestioned for almost four minutes by the media queen, herself, the expert bloviates, “Now, employers will not hire you unless you have a credit report and a good FICO score” (1:24). Orman gets a pass from the interviewer, Arianna Huffington.

In the article associated with the video, the Huffington Post, itself, says the same thing: “It can also affect their ability to rent an apartment and get a job, as many employers now check credit scores as part of the hiring process.”

Where are all the tough questions?  They just wind her up, and let her go.  Interviewed by an actual namesake–the publisher of ForbesWoman–an oddly agitated, seething Orman said, “And because they have a FICO score, a landlord will rent to them, an employer will hire them, their car insurance will be lower (especially if it’s a good FICO score)” (5:11).

She also said, “In my opinion, credit scoring is obsolete” (1:13) while her mug still sits on the FICO credit score website as she hawks credit scores.

Discussing her legacy (“I’m closer to 61, now, than I am 60.”), the prolific author proclaims to all the people, “I want to create a new scoring system.  I hope they call it the S.O. Score” (5:46).

Oh, brother.

And then (speaking of promoting oneself) there’s the SELF thing, itself.  It is easy to see why Orman would gush, “I love SELF Magazine.” The Condé Nast publication edited out the part about employers and scores.  But they left in the bit about “Suze Orman, the smartest woman about money in perhaps the world.”

Perhaps.

 

credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:43 PM
To: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes; Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes
Subject: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20

See this message and your response at http://blog.creditscoring.com/?p=2274, http://blog.creditscoring.com/?cat=134 and http://blog.creditscoring.com/?tag=forbes.

You wrote

But one’s creditworthiness, as reflected in a FICO score or a credit report, now affects a lot more than the ability to borrow money or buy something on credit. It can affect whether you get a job, what you pay for insurance, and even how your personal relationships work out.

and

Employment consultants say a troubling credit score may cause hiring officers to more closely question an applicant. Vic Tanon, chief simplicity officer at Emplicity, an organization that consults in hiring practices across the U.S., says a bad credit rating is likely to be more of a factor in certain industries like financial services.

Who is your source regarding credit score use by employers?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

Canada – Pointage de crédit junk journalism from ValueClick

In an item on the Globe and Mail website, an Investopedia article contends, “Credit scores range from 300 to 850.”  However, in Canada the “pointages FICO vont de 300 à 900.”

In the U.S., the FICO credit score scale is 300 to 850.

Investopedia (who is actually based in Canada), a division of ValueClick, provides junk journalism articles to Hearst and Forbes, too.  Martin T. Hart is the chairman of ValueClick according to Forbes.  Whether you choose to believe Forbes about that is entirely up to you.