Forbes’ attempt at hipness; Forbes’ correction policy

Ah, youth, and fabulous New York.

The “journalist,” “Interactive Editor,” and “web editor” now works for Reuters, who has it all figured out.

And if you think that’s rich

 

[ORIGINAL MESSAGE]

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:43 PM
To: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes; Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes
Subject: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20

See this message and your response at http://blog.creditscoring.com/?p=2274, http://blog.creditscoring.com/?cat=134 and http://blog.creditscoring.com/?tag=forbes.

You wrote

But one’s creditworthiness, as reflected in a FICO score or a credit report, now affects a lot more than the ability to borrow money or buy something on credit. It can affect whether you get a job, what you pay for insurance, and even how your personal relationships work out.

and

Employment consultants say a troubling credit score may cause hiring officers to more closely question an applicant. Vic Tanon, chief simplicity officer at Emplicity, an organization that consults in hiring practices across the U.S., says a bad credit rating is likely to be more of a factor in certain industries like financial services.

Who is your source regarding credit score use by employers?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 3:10 PM
To: Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Cc: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes; Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes; Monie Begley, Forbes
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

Did you discuss the topic of credit scores with Forbes?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 3:09 PM
To: Greg Fisher
Subject: Out of Office: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

I am out of the office at a Fellowship orientation until July 31. Please excuse my late replies to emails. If you need immediate assistance, please contact Tina Russo. [Russo’s email].

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 9:28 PM
To: Tina Russo, senior editor, Forbes
Subject: FW: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

—–Original Message—–
From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 3:09 PM
To: Greg Fisher
Subject: Out of Office: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

I am out of the office at a Fellowship orientation until July 31. Please excuse my late replies to emails. If you need immediate assistance, please contact Tina Russo. [Russo’s email].

 

 

From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 5:56 AM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, Emplicity

Dear Greg,

My apologies for not responding to this until now. I am unsure if you spoke directly with him, but Vic Tannon was my source for that statement. Perhaps there is something you can add?

Heather Struck
Forbes
Markets, New York
[phone]
Follow me: http://blogs.forbes.com/people/hstruck/

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 7:43 AM
To: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes
Cc: Monie Begley, Forbes; Tina Russo, senior editor, Forbes; Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, CRAs

The consumer reporting agencies do not provide credit scores for employment purposes.

What correction will you make?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Struck, Heather [mailto:HStruck@forbes.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 8:01 AM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Cc: Begley, Monie; Russo, Tina; Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, CRAs

I understand your point, but it is very clearly sourced. The point there is some occupations have been known to look at credit scores in an evaluation, according to this source. I agree this point needs clarification, and you are very welcome to post a comment on the story.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/heatherstruck/2011/07/20/credit-score-fico-can-hurt-you/

Thanks for the note,

Heather Struck
Forbes
Markets, New York
[phone]
Follow me: http://blogs.forbes.com/people/hstruck/

 

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 1:12 PM
To: Heather Struck, reporter, Forbes
Cc: Monie Begley, Forbes; Tina Russo, senior editor, Forbes; Vic Tannon, chief simplicity officer, CEO, founder and president, Emplicity
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, clarity

Only you mentioned clarification so there is nothing to agree upon.

According to consumer reporting agency TransUnion, a “rating” is the manner of payment of an individual account.

Who are your other sources?

What authority do you, as the writer, have in making corrections of errors of fact, or clarifications of unclear stories or attribution published by Forbes?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

 

From: Struck, Heather
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 2:00 PM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Forbes, 2011-07-20, clarity

My editor has authority to make corrections. You can be in touch with him if you like.

Matthew Schifrin – [email address]

Thanks –

Heather Struck
Forbes
Markets, New York
[phone]
Follow me: http://blogs.forbes.com/people/hstruck/

 

Experian claims employers consider credit scores for hiring

A long time ago, Experian, itself, stated, “Experian’s business policy prevents the inclusion of credit scores with an employment report, at Experian called Employment Insight.”

Today, however, Experian states, “Creditors, landlords, and even some employers consider a person’s credit score before deciding whether they will approve a loan, lease an apartment, or hire an applicant.”

That quotation is from ProtectMyID, a “part of Experian.”

In the United Kingdom, for that kind of monkey business, you are rewarded with knighthood.

And, with that, we have a new countdown.

 

@Experian can’t make up its mind on employers using credit scores

While the head of Experian (the sheriff of Nottingham) continues his 2-year resignation, the consumer reporting agency remains internally conflicted regarding the urban legend that employers use credit scores.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports, (Experian spokeswoman Susan) “Henson says the report Experian provides to employers excludes some information given to lenders, such as a credit score, year of birth, any reference to a spouse and “any account numbers not relevant to the hiring decision.'”

Experian, itself, states, “Experian’s Employment Insight report includes similar information about loans and credit cards that is listed in the credit report. It does not include year of birth, spouse reference, account number or credit score, which are irrelevant to hiring decisions” (click on “Bad credit doesn’t impact candidates getting hired.”).

Experian also says: “Employers never get a credit score. Unfortunately, that is a very common misperception” (click on “Do employers actually pull the credit report from the credit reporting company or do they pull just the score?”).

However, elsewhere, Experian says (tweets, actually), http://mashable.com/2011/08/09/linkedin-profile-job-search/ to help get you closer to that job offer (the one that requires a background check complete with credit score!).

And here’s another doozy (as reported by creditscoring.com) from Experian: “More Employers Check Applicants’ Credit Scores.”

Wassup Sheriff Knightman?

Fox corrects, then repeats, credit score employers myth

In November, Adam Levin, chairman and co-founder of Credit.com and former director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs appeared on something from the Fox Business Network called FBN Live.  

Levin said, “Employers are not allowed–nor do they–look at credit scores; that’s an urban myth.” (37:00)

Interviewer Tracy Byrnes responds: “Wait! Can you say that again? So, in theory, your employer is not supposed to look at your score?”

Levin explains that credit reports for employment purposes do not even contain credit scores.

However, the title of the web page for the video is “Don’t Let Your Credit Score Hurt Your Job Hunt – We take a look at how a bad credit score could hurt your job prospects.”

And, last month, in a conversation about about money and human emotion, the Fox Business host had this exchange with an author and “CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional” who has a “passion for helping people”* (1:45):

GUEST:  It’s a stressful time.

HOST: Well, especially because, now, you know, you go for a new job and your new employer’s looking at your credit score. 

GUEST: Yes!

HOST:  It’s everywhere.

GUEST:  Agh! 

HOST: Right?

GUEST: It’s true.  It’s true.

The web page for that video is titled, “Emotions Behind Our Financial Decisions – Financial advisor and author Karen Lee offers insight into understanding the emotions behind our financial decisions.”

But another unfortunate action brings the circus full-circle.  Even Credit.com states: “Your credit score is a determining factor in your mortgage and auto loan terms, credit card rates and insurance premiums. Some employers and landlords also take your score into consideration.”

*see all the clichés: “passion,” “helping people,” etc.

Experian’s Twitter foray: Jobs and credit scores

@Experian_US (John Peace [alt 8/14/12], the sheriff of Nottingham) wants to insert himself into the conversation, but does not respond.

His shiny, new, search engine-friendly, $200-million CreditReport.com says, “Not all employers pull an applicant’s credit history or place tremendous weight on it, but individuals working in government or financial roles can expect their credit scores to be a factor.”

However, Experian also says, “No, Experian’s business policy prevents the inclusion of credit scores with an employment report, at Experian called Employment Insight.”

So, apparently, somebody related to government is beaking the rules.

Follow the one-way conversation.

Countdown to when Experian removes statement about employers using scores III

Tweet, tweet.

Experian says, “Credit reports are not scored when used for employment purposes; they are typically reviewed as part of the character evaluation as well as to verify identity and application information.”

CreditReport.com says, “More Employers Check Applicants’ Credit Scores.”

Experian owns CreditReport.com.

Countdown to when Experian removes statement about employers using scores

Return here to find out when Experian removed its statement that employers use credit scores.

Here is the statement:

“Credit scoring helps potential lenders, landlords, and employers quickly gauge an applicant’s credit history.”

At the bottom of the page Experian implores, “Contact Us – If this doesn’t answer your question please contact us.”

By all means, contact them.

The domains qspace.com and iplace.com are part of Experian’s out-of-control pile of web addresses.


From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2009 9:18 PM
To: help@qspace.com; heather.mclaughlin@experian.com; mediarelations@experian.com; corporate.responsibility@experian.com
Cc: greg@creditscoring.com
Subject: credit score, employers, Experian, iplace.com

You state, ”Credit scoring helps potential lenders, landlords, and employers quickly gauge an applicant’s credit history.”

http://qspace.iplace.com/qspace/DirectPull/3D_key.asp?section=ALL

After the tongue-lashing you took at creditscoring.com, you should consider a different line of work.

http://www.creditscoring.com/influence/industry/consumerreportingagencies/experian/training-employer.html

What is the name of an employer who uses credit scores?