Wikipedia states scores under 600 are “poor”

Wikipedia has an article about practically everything credit-related:  annualcrediteport.com, consumer credit risk, credit history, credit rating, credit score, credit score “(United States),” FICO, and on and on.

There is even an article about the number 600.  In it, a Wikipedian contends that 600 or below is a “poor” credit score, but does not identify the score model.

Of course, a 600 FICO score is a relative number; what is poor to one lender might be acceptable to another.  On its shining new website ScoreInfo, FICO credit score company Fair Isaac can’t seem to bring itself to even use the term.  And, while it calls 560 to 659 “Not good,” it says that some lenders will still approve loans at that range.  But, the Wizard takes a hard line in the next lower category.  It calls scores lower than 560 “Bad.”

Wikipedia removes one, but not all references to employers and scores

In the Wikipedia article Credit score, a Wikipedia editor removed the word employers from a typical series describing who uses credit scores:  “mobile phone companies, insurance companies, employers, landlords, and government departments.”

The Wikipedian noted: “It’s a common misconception/myth that potential employers receive credit scores. Their specific version of a credit report does not include a score.”

However, the editor failed to remove the reference to employers later in the same article.

Wikipedia links to Federal Reserve document that claims employers use credit scores

Popular message board pretending to be an encyclopedia Wikipedia added a link to a source using an unattributed claim this week.

In its article Credit score, Wikipedia listed the paper, “Your Credit Score Is a Ranking, Not a Score,” an item in the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland publication “Economic Commentary.” 

The first sentence of the November 16 paper states that credit scores are used in hiring decisions.  However, the consumer reporting agencies all state that they do not provide scores for employment purposes.  John Ulzheimer of SmartCredit.com calls it the myth of the decade.

To drive home the notion, the Federal Reserve even created a video containing a depiction of a job application.  The paper’s author, a Federal Reserve spokesperson and the chairman have not responded to a request for evidence supporting the claim.  The central bank did not mention creditscoring.com again

The Wikipedia user who added the link has also contributed to the articles Bubble Tea, Play-Doh and The Ambiguously Gay Duo.  Last week, creditscoring.com published “Groundhog Day, 2011 – Wikipedia on credit scores.”

credit score, utilization ratio, Wikipedia reference to USA TODAY, unverified

SEE ORIGINAL EMAIL TO USA TODAY

From: Block, Sandra
Sent: Friday, February 04, 2011 11:47 AM
To: ‘greg@creditscoring.com’
Subject: RE: credit score, utilization ratio, Wikipedia reference to USA TODAY

http://www.myfico.com/CreditEducation/WhatsInYourScore.aspx

Sandra Block
Personal Finance Reporter
USA TODAY
You can find my stories and columns at: http://www.usatoday.com/community/tags/reporter.aspx?id=561
Follow me at:
http://twitter.com/sandyblock

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Friday, February 04, 2011 12:51 PM
To: Sandra Block, reporter, personal finance, USA TODAY
Subject: RE: credit score, utilization ratio, Wikipedia reference to USA TODAY, unverified

SEE http://blog.creditscoring.com/?tag=usa-today-ratio.

That document does not verify your statement.  In it, 30% is a number assigned to an entire category called “Amounts Owed.” 6 items comprise the category.  For instance, one is “Number of Accounts with Balances,” and has nothing to do with the ratio of debt to available credit.  “Proportion of credit lines used (proportion of balances to total credit limits on certain types of revolving accounts)” is only one item in the category and is listed fifth.

What correction will you make?

 

credit score, utilization ratio, Wikipedia reference to USA TODAY

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Friday, February 04, 2011 11:25 AM
To: Sandra Block, reporter, personal finance, USA TODAY
Subject: credit score, utilization ratio, Wikipedia reference to USA TODAY

THIS MESSAGE IS PUBLISHED AT http://blog.creditscoring.com/?p=1727.

You wrote, “The amount of debt you have outstanding, as a percentage of your available credit limit, accounts for 30% of your score.”

However, Fair Isaac explains that, to avoid misleading the public, it does not make such a claim.

Wikipedia uses your story containing that sentence as a reference regarding “30% — Credit utilization.”

Who is your source?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342